The “W” Memories – Walking down the Camino Memory Lane

Walk in my shoes

Walk in my shoes

Every pilgrim’s Camino is personal and different. We might walk the same roads, sleep in the same albergues, attend the same masses but every single pilgrim comes with its own personal experiences, thoughts and dreams.

When I saw these boots, I was reminded of the statement “Walk a mile in my shoes” meaning live my life as I am living it before thinking you might know of me.

This stands true for every experience we have in life. We shouldn’t assume or believe we know what the other person is feeling, thinking or experiencing – our journeys are very unique and personal.

Watermelon Carrier

Watermelon Carrier

I often found myself laughing out loud when seeing something funny or unique. I was reminded of times I heard “have laptop, will travel” or “have suitcase, will travel”.

In this case, thanks to this handy grocery store watermelon carrier, I could actually say “Have watermelon, will travel”! What an interesting carrier!

Weary

Weary

Oh, how many times did I feel like this weary pilgrim depicted in this statue… More than I care to admit, but almost all times, it was a good weary.

Especially during the first week of walking, regardless of the training I had done (and for my second camino, I had trained extensively) the end of day would find me in complete state of tired, sore and exhausted.

Fortunately, a few weeks into the walking and the body adjusts so amazingly that most evenings would finished with me being tired but not sore nor exhausted.

Welcome

Welcome

We often would walk so many kilometers waiting to see a village or town in the far distance. Some of the towns announced their presence ahead of their town limits with signs or in this case, monuments. What a welcomed sight!

It was much like a little fanfare showing us the way into the town or village, and for many of us, it meant a chance for a short rest, a cafe con leche, a bite to eat, a location to buy a few items.

worker

worker

I barely noticed this field worker as I walked by as I was so fixated on the road ahead of me.

I noticed just how small he seemed in this vast field, and I realized what a huge job he had, tending to this field by hand. I couldn’t quite make out what he was doing, but every so often he would bend down and totally disappear from view, only to resurface a minute later.

It made me feel very humbled and blessed that I was taking so many weeks to walk the Camino and wondered if he ever walked it on his own.

Cheers from my virtual Camino tour!

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